Bowling Glossary

 
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ALL
D
D.O.A.
Short for "dead on arrival"; applied to a dead ball.
DANCER
Pin bouncing end to end, or end over end (usually off to SIDEWALL).
DARTS
See arrows.
DASH (-)
A dash written in the place of a mark where scoring after two balls - indicates that no MARK was made in that box. (Dashes are used by scorekeepers in bowling competitions).
DEAD BALL
A ball that is out of play, or that does not count as rolled (not fair, not foul). Also ball with little action. As it applies to resin balls, a ball is "dead" when the reaction cannot be obtained similar to what it was when new. In such a case resurfacing may be required.
DEAD WOOD
Pins that remain on the lane or in the gutter after being knocked down after the machine has reset the pins. They are removed in ten-pin before play continues, but left in place in both candlepin and duckpin bowling.
DECK
Shorthand for "pindeck"; the surface of the lane ends upon which the pins are spotted.
DEEP DOODOO
What you are in if your opponent is zoned.
DEEP INSIDE LINE
A strike line that is popular among the big hook players in which the player stands on a high numbered board and aims for a lower numbered board; for a right handed player, this means that they start their delivery on the far left of the approach.
DEFLECTION
The movement of the ball or pins when they contact each other. Deflection is neither good nor bad, but you can have too much or too little. Deflection is needed to make many spares and to get strikes.
DELIVERED A MESSAGE
Usually means that a pin or pins came off the kickbacks to take out another pin or pins.
DELIVERY
A bowler's entire movement, from approach to follow-through. A thrown shot; the act of throwing a shot.
DEUCE
A game of 200 or more.
DEXTERS/DEXTER SHOES
One of the big bowling shoe manufacturers.
DIE
An expression used to indicate that the ball stopped its strong hooking action before entering the pocket. "The ball died".
DIFFERENTIAL
It is the difference between the lowest and highest RGs. You compute the high and subtract the low from that and you have the differential. There is no minimum for differential. What differential tells you: RG Differential is an indicator of track flare POTENTIAL in a bowling ball. Differentials in the .01s to .02s would mean that a ball has a lower track flare potential, .03s to .04s would be the medium range for track flare potential, and the .05s to .080 would indicate a high track flare potential. These ranges above are not based on cardinal rules. They are BTM in-house rules of thumb because there are no published guidelines. Also, differential is a guide to the internal versatility of a ball. It can indicate just how much of a length adjustment can be made through drilling. A low differential will allow for only a modest variance in length (from shortest drilling to longest) which may translate into as little as a foot or two. An extremely high differential may translate into a length window in the neighborhood of eight feet.
DIME STORE
The 5-10 split.
DINNER BUCKET
Same as bucket.
DITCH
The gutter; the channel.
DIVE
A sharp, last-instant break by the ball; it is said to "dive into the pocket."
DIVE/DOVE
The action of the ball that hooks greatly at the last moments before hitting the pins. i.e., "I swung the ball out and it dove back."
DODO
A ball that is balanced illegally.
DONK/DOINK/DORK
An expression used by some players to indicate that they threw a particularly bad shot. "I dorked the ball."
DOTS
Series of seven spots on the lanes past the foul line but before the arrows; used to assist in targeting and alignment; also, the same spots on the approach normally used to align your feet in your initial stance. Markers on the runway that guide the bowler's approach.
DOUBLE
Two consecutive strikes in the same game.
DOUBLE GUTTER
Throwing two balls in a row into the gutter. Detrimental to high scoring.
DOUBLE PINOCHLE
Same as big ears.
DOUBLE WOOD
Any two pins such that one is directly behind the other; i.e., the 2-8; 3-9; 1-5. Same as barmaid.
DOVETAILS
The portion of a wood lane where the maple and pine boards meet; same as "splice".
DOWN AND IN
Refers to a line that is more direct and parallel to the boards; opposite of bellying the ball.
DOWN THE BOARDS
Refers to a line that is more direct and parallel to the boards; opposite of bellying the ball.
DRESSING
The lane conditioner; the act of applying lane conditioner.
DRIFT
The number of boards that you vary from straight in your approach to the foul line. For example, if you place the inside edge of your slide foot on board 15 on the approach, but your inside edge slides on the 12 board at the foul line, you have a three board inward drift.
DRIVE
Usually used to indicate the power of the ball as it hits the pin. "It drove through the rack."
DRY LANE BALL
A ball that for you and your game performs better on dry lanes than on more heavily conditioned lanes; you can sometimes achieve the result by polishing a ball to make it shinier so that it skids more before hooking.
DRY LANES
A lane that has less conditioner than normal for your game; usually means earlier and more hook.
DUMMY
Score allowed for an absent player; see also "blind score".
DUMP
To release the ball without bending the knee, which usually makes it travel through the air before plopping down on the lane.
DUMP/DUMPING
The practice of dropping the ball at or before the foul line; not usually desirable.
DUTCH 200
A game of exactly 200 made by alternating strikes and spares throughout the entire game.
DYNAMIC IMBALANCE
The planned apparent imbalance in balls due to high tech cores and drilling techniques. Many people claim that this has created balls that hook out of the box with a lessening requirement to have the skill to impart the hook and power by the bowler themselves.
DYNAMIC WEIGHTS
In the old days, before the advent of modern core design in balls, the center of the ball was, more or less, symmetrical. In today's high tech computer designed ball cores and multiple cores designs, you can have cores that are not evenly balanced and distributed within the center of the ball; this allows balls to be drilled and designed in a manner that the apparent "weight" of the ball can shift depending on the drilling pattern; i.e., it is not "static" it is "dynamic".

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